UN Security Council votes for new peacekeeping force in Somalia

SOMALIA, Belet Weyne: In a photograph released by the African Union-United Nations Information Support Team 16 November, soldiers of the Djiboutian Contingent serving with the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) stand to attention during the arrival of further troops to the central Somali town of Belet Weyne, approx. 300km north west of the Somali capital Mogadishu. The air lift is part of a deployment to begin boosting the just over 300 personnel already on the ground to approx. 1,000 troops serving under the UN-supported AU mission in Somalia. AU-UN IST PHOTO / STUART PRICE.
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The new mission will work to enable Somali forces to take primary responsibility for security

The Security Council on Thursday unanimously adopted a resolution to reconfigure the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) into the African Union Transition Mission in Somalia.

The Council endorsed a previous decision it made with the African Union after it underscored the need to continue countering al-Shabaab.

The resolution was announced by the United Arab Emirates, which currently holds the presidency of the UNSC.

“Following several months of constructive exchanges, the @UN Security Council has adopted a resolution which endorses the @_AfricanUnion Peace & Security Council’s decision to reconfigure @AMISOM. It is now the African Union Transition Mission in Somalia (ATMIS),” UNSC said.

“This resolution is a result of extensive and constructive discussions between the Government of Somalia, the UN, the AU, and the EU, and as such, it reflects a broad consensus on the need for a reconfigured African Union mission in Somalia focused on enabling and supporting the Somali security transition.”

The Council expressed hope that the Government of Somalia will gradually assume greater security responsibilities going forward.

The new mission will work to enable Somali forces to take primary responsibility for security.

“We note, however, that Somalia still faces many security challenges, key among them the incessant attacks by the terrorist group Al Shabab. These attacks not only pose security threats to Somalia – but also a transnational threat to the broader region,” the security council said.